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Copper and Brass

Tips for Contractors Who Are Looking for Suppliers of Copper and Brass Sales

Having a successful construction business takes more than employing the most highly skilled professionals. You must have a vast network of the best material suppliers within a hundred mile radius from your business place. These suppliers must be able to provide you with superior materials for all of your projects, big and small alike.

One supplier that you should carefully choose is a metal supplier, particularly one that offers supplies for finishing, including hinges, doorknobs, trims, and all sorts of fixture. This is, most of the time, different from the one that supplies you with construction metals, such as reinforcing steel bars. When looking for such supplier, there are several important factors you need to look at.

Specialization

The best trims and fixtures for buildings are those that are made of copper alloys, such as bronze and brass. Whether it’s the towel bars in your bathroom or the splashing in your kitchen, copper alloys outmatch other metals in terms of appearance and durability. Therefore, it would be best to find a supplier that specializes in copper alloys. At least with a company that offers copper and brass sales you can be sure to find even the rarest grades. Top suppliers like Rotax Metals even provide custom solutions.

Reputation

It goes without saying that a supplier with a clean and impressive track record is also the most trustworthy. Find a supplier who’s been in operation for a long time and has served the biggest names in the construction business. This way you can be sure that your company will also receive the same level of customer service and quality of products those companies vouch for.

Inventory and Supply

You want a supplier that can provide you with all the materials you need for each project anytime and in any situation, regardless of whether the economy is good or bad. They must have a huge inventory with a vast selection of items and grades to choose from. The last thing you want is to be in a situation where emergency supply is needed only to find out your supplier can’t deliver. This is why it is imperative to opt for a supplier that has a good supplier of their own or better still one that manufactures their own products.

Customization and Extra Services

Of course, it’s understandable that even the biggest suppliers don’t have a solution available for all kinds of project. Some projects may have highly specific needs that no standard commercially available products can suffice. This is where customization comes in. Not very many metal suppliers are capable of customizing. Only companies like Rotax Metals that have their own foundries and manufacturing sites may be able to deliver. It also helps to find a company that offers extra special services, such as metal fabrication, metal shearing, polishing, and water jet cutting.

Having a trusted metal supplier as a partner can make a huge difference in your construction business. Not only will it shorten delivery time but your customer satisfaction will improve as well. To further expedite your process, find a company that allows you to buy copper online. This company would normally have a professional-looking and user-friendly website.

 

Source:

How to Choose the Right Supplier for Your Business

Copper and Brass Sales—Are You Sure You Know Which Metal Is Best for Your Projects?

Copper and BrassThe annual copper production in the United States continues to grow due to the increasing demand mostly by the construction, transportation, electrical, and electronics industries. Although the increment fluctuates year after year, the copper mining industry sees only an uptrend in domestic production, which is expected not to dip anytime soon regardless of the state of global supply.

If you are planning a project that involves the use of a considerable amount of copper supplies, now is the best time to commence while production is still at its peak. Before you go about the project, however, it helps to fill yourself in with vital information about copper and its types that you will be using in making decisions. Keep in mind that each alloy of copper has its unique properties that work for select applications. Find the metals with the properties that you need for the project. To help you decide, let’s compare copper with its major alloys—bronze and brass.

Copper

Copper is one of the first metals discovered by man. Its use dates back 10,000 years, revolutionizing many fields of technology, including hunting, architecture, and construction all in its purest form. This is all thanks to copper’s unique set of properties, the most useful of which include corrosion resistance and high electrical and thermal conductivity. In fact, the only reason it can last for thousands of years is that it is extremely resistant to corrosion. It usually takes that long to see real signs of damage on its surface.

When exposed to oxygen, copper’s surface forms a layer of new material called patina. This later becomes copper’s shield against further deterioration. It doesn’t easily melt when exposed to extreme heat, making it a perfect material for machine parts. With its electrical conductivity, copper can convey high voltage electricity without burning up, which explains why most of today’s wires and cables are made of copper. To better understand the properties of copper and know where to buy copper sheet, ask a metal expert from any of the well-known suppliers in your area.

 

Brass

An alloy of copper and zinc, brass is widely known for its gold-like appearance. With the right combination, it can look exactly like gold, making it the perfect alternative if you want fancy-looking decorative and structural features in your building. Apart from the elegant appearance, brass also has its share of functional properties that can be used for various practical functions.

Due to its malleability and ductility, which by the way it inherited from its main component copper, it can be hammered or pressed into thin sheets or drawn into small wires. This metal also has a good acoustic property, which is why many types of musical instrument are made from it. The copper in brass is known for its antimicrobial properties as well, and therefore brass tubes are preferred for pipes used in water systems.

 

Bronze

A metal so popular it was named after an entire era, bronze has been the most widely produced copper alloy in the ancient times. This metal is formed by combining copper and tin. Sometimes, other elements such as aluminum, manganese, and nickel are added to produce an even stronger and more resilient variant.

Bronze has high wear and tear resistance, a critical property for machine bearings that are exposed to friction and torsion forces. It is capable of producing a unique kind of patina as well. With its ability to expand as it cools down to its re-crystallization state, bronze is practically the perfect metal for sculpture.

Now that you have basic knowledge of the differences between copper and brass sales, you can better choose the most efficient material for your project. Whether you need copper sheets or brass tubes, it will be much easier to pick the right alloy. The only thing you have to remember is to look for it in the right supplier. You’ll have a better chance if you will turn to a reliable metal supplier in New York, such as Rotax Metals.

 

Source:

Mineral Commodity Summaries 2017, minerals.usgs.gov

Understanding Corrosion and Why Copper and Brass Suppliers Are Not Worried about It

Corrosion

Most people believe that the world they live in is a calm and comfortable place. In reality, it is more hostile than they can possibly imagine. Everything on Earth is locked in a constant battle for survival. The environment is so fragile that even the slightest shift in the balance could push life to extinction.

It is only when living things learned to adapt and evolve that the world became less hostile. Yet the fact remains that when the world can no longer support life as we know it, everything will perish and decompose. All that will be left is a barren wasteland with nothing more than dust and rocks.

The famous adage “from dust you came, and to dust you shall return,” is originally addressed to all living things. It pertains to the natural process of decomposition when a carbon-based material loses resistance against the effects of its environment. It turns out that this principle applies to inorganic materials as well. The only difference is that their decomposition takes a lot longer and is influenced by a greater variety of factors. This process is more commonly known as corrosion.

 

Corrosion of Metals

Corrosion takes place when a certain material is placed in an environment where it is chemically unstable. Metals are among the best examples of materials that undergo this process. Despite being tougher and more resilient than most other materials, they have their share of weakness. There are certain chemicals that they don’t react well to. If you’ve seen the film Batman vs. Superman, particularly the part where Batman was able to weaken Superman by exposing him to kryptonite, it works pretty much the same way.

Understanding corrosion is important because it affects the properties for which metals are used in a vast range of applications. By knowing which element in an alloy reacts to which substance, metallurgists can more easily determine the best way to adjust the alloy’s composition to form a more corrosion-resistant material.

Perhaps that most widely held catalyst for corrosion is oxygen because most metals react to it. This has been proven by Antoine Lavoisier, the French chemist who also authored the law of conservation of mass and played a critical role in recognizing oxygen as an element. His experiments revealed that iron, together with all other ferrous metals, reacts to oxygen by forming iron oxide or rust. If not for Lavoisier’s discovery, iron (which makes up most of today’s man-made structures) would have not been utilized for applications where air exposure is involved.

 

Resisting Oxygen-Related Corrosion

Metals that do not contain iron usually resist corrosion with oxygen. The best example of this type of metal is copper and all of its alloys. Instead of forming rust when exposed to oxygen, copper forms a layer of greenish material known as patina. This layer does not affect the interior of the metal and rather encapsulates it to prevent further corrosion.

Alloys of copper, such as brass and bronze, exhibit this property as well. In most cases, they resist corrosion caused by even more potent substances, including saltwater and certain acids. They also hold up to extreme temperatures, which explains why most manufacturers prefer them for making machine parts. It’s no wonder reliable bronze and brass suppliers make so much fortune.

Brass and bronze are alloyed with other metals to form even stronger and more corrosion-resistant metals. Muntz metal, a type of alpha-beta brass, for instance, is used for making cover plating for ships due to its high tolerance to saltwater corrosion. This type of brass resists fouling, too. Another popular example is silicon bronze, which essentially is bronze combined with a little bit of silicon. This metal is almost if not stronger than steel, making it a good material for making pumps and boilers or for applications where the strength of steel is needed but not its weakness to rusting.

 

Other Substances that Can Trigger or Accelerate Corrosion

Oxygen is not the only element that can trigger or accelerate corrosion. In fact, any solid, liquid, or gas substances can cause corrosion depending on the metal exposed to them. Acids (such as sulfuric acid, nitric acid, and hydrochloric acid) and bases (such as sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide) are also notorious for corroding many different types of alloy.

Some metals could also corrode when exposed to dehydrating agents, such as phosphorus pentoxide or calcium oxide; halogens and halogen salts, such as bromine and sodium hypochlorite; organic halides; and acid anhydrides.

 

Using Corrosion to Your Advantage

There’s no denying the destruction corrosion can bring to one’s project. If left unchecked, it can lead to construction failure, consequently endangering people’s lives. However, it does not always have to be viewed negatively. There are certain applications for which it can be beneficial, such as furniture making and metal disposal.

It takes many years for bronze to achieve a kind of patina that gives it an antique look. For those who sell bronze furniture and believe that lost time is lost money, however, waiting that long is outright counterproductive. This is why they resort to a process called patination in which they speed up the formation of patina. It involves controlled exposure of bronze to a certain corrosive substance until the beautiful brown and green color, which usually takes years to produce, emerges in a few days.

Working with metals, especially for projects that require stability and strength among other critical properties, is a high risk. You have to be able to tell which metals corrode to which substances first. It would be better, though, to use metals that you know won’t succumb to corrosion that easily. Why not go to a trusted copper sheet supplier like Rotax Metals and ask what specific types of metal supplies you need. They specialize in all kinds of copper alloy, and so you will definitely find the materials you need and get the value for your money in the end.

 

Sources:

Chemistry of Oxygen (Z=8), chem.libretexts.org
Corrosion, newworldencyclopedia.org
Corrosion 101: What Is Corrosion?, eoncoat.com

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